Categories

A sample text widget

Etiam pulvinar consectetur dolor sed malesuada. Ut convallis euismod dolor nec pretium. Nunc ut tristique massa.

Nam sodales mi vitae dolor ullamcorper et vulputate enim accumsan. Morbi orci magna, tincidunt vitae molestie nec, molestie at mi. Nulla nulla lorem, suscipit in posuere in, interdum non magna.

Power Week-in-Review: Human Kinetic Energy Harvester & Wireless EV Charger Forecast

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have found a way both to lower the cost and improve the power conversion efficiency of polymer solar cells, which offer potential use in applications such as sensors, lighting, and consumer products. The researchers found that by adding a small amount of graphene nanoflakes to such cells as a charge transporter, they were able to achieve a threefold increase in efficiency. For more, see “UC Researchers Report on Discovery to Make Solar Power Less Expensive and More Efficient.”

By adding a small amount of graphene nanoflakes to polymer solar cells — which are thinner and more flexible than silicon solar cells, but not as efficient — researchers have achieved a threefold increase in efficiency.(Source: University of Cincinnati)
By adding a small amount of graphene nanoflakes to polymer solar cells — which are thinner and more flexible than silicon solar cells, but not as efficient — researchers have achieved a threefold increase in efficiency.
(Source: University of Cincinnati)

Researchers at the University of Auckland, New Zealand have developed a small, wearable electromagnetic energy harvester that harvests human vibrational kinetic energy to extend the operating life of biomedical devices. Comprising a snake-shaped silicone cantilever, a coil, and an NdFeB magnet, the device has an approximately 6.6-Hz resonant frequency and -10-mVpp output when tested with an acceleration of 0.3 g. The output increases to approximately -40 mVpp when tested at 1.5 g — similar to the acceleration experienced when a person walks. For more, see “An Energy Harvester From Human Vibrational Kinetic Energy for Wearable Biomedical Devices.”
More eetimes.com

Share

Leave a Reply