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Nissan Leaf & Tesla Model S Hold #1 & #2 Spots In US Electric Car Sales

As far as the overall electric car sales rankings go, not much changed in the US last month. The Nissan Leaf took the #1 spot again thanks to a low price and good value, and the fact that its parent company actually wants to sell electric cars. The #2 spot went to the world’s best mass-manufactured car, the Tesla Model S. The 2013 sales leader, the Chevy Volt, remained at #3 for the third straight month, reportedly hampered by supply limitations (as well as decreasing competitiveness in the past year). Potential Volt competitors (though, each with their own benefits and minuses)—the Toyota Prius Plug-in, Ford Fusion Energi, and Ford Fusion C-Max—rounded out the top 6. Much more info and charts are below in an EV Obsession repost.

Following its market-leading position in January US electric car sales, the Nissan LEAF took #1 again in February. (Though, it was just a little above our estimate for Tesla Model S deliveries*, and if Tesla wasn’t supply-limited and shipping cars to Europe, it would likely have landed at #1.)

The top 6 models were actually exactly the same in February as they were in January. The Chevy Volt remained at #3, still taking a noticeable hit in sales from a combination of increasing competition and potential production bottlenecks. The Toyota Prius Plug-in remained at #4, the Ford Fusion Energi remained at #5, and the Ford C-Max Energi remained at #6. Congrats to Toyota and Ford for holding strong, which is likely a testament to their EV manufacturing approach, which is to have electric models share manufacturing lines with conventional sister models, allowing for easy ramping up or down of production as demand warrants.
More cleantechnica.com

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