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The Fukushima catastrophe and what you can do | The Salinas Californian | thecalifornian.com

The Fukushima catastrophe is worsening, and we can panic or take action.

“How serious this accident is? Very, very serious, of course … Still not under control … We’re still in the stage of accident,” Dr. Tatsujiro Suzuki, vice chairman of the Japan Atomic Energy Commission, said as recently as Oct. 12.

The initial explosions in March 2011 spread radiation worldwide; airborne radiation reached the West Coast in three days. Monitors show ongoing rising air contamination here, and Japan is burning radioactive debris, further contaminating the air. Rain increases exposure. Kelp absorbs radiation. Berkeley rainwater after the initial accident was 181 times the federal limit for radioactive iodine in drinking water.

The fuel cores of reactors 1, 2, and 3 melted down and through, and may have gone into the Earth.

“The levels of radiation in buildings 1, 2 and 3 are now so high that no human can enter or get close to the molten cores,” said Dr. Helen Caldicott, founder of Physicians for Social Responsibility, and president of the Nuclear Policy Research Institute.

More http://www.thecalifornian.com/article/20131217/OPINION04/312170010/The-Fukushima-catastrophe-what-you-can-do?nclick_check=1

The Fukushima catastrophe and what you can do | The Salinas Californian | thecalifornian.com

The Fukushima catastrophe is worsening, and we can panic or take action.

“How serious this accident is? Very, very serious, of course … Still not under control … We’re still in the stage of accident,” Dr. Tatsujiro Suzuki, vice chairman of the Japan Atomic Energy Commission, said as recently as Oct. 12.

The initial explosions in March 2011 spread radiation worldwide; airborne radiation reached the West Coast in three days. Monitors show ongoing rising air contamination here, and Japan is burning radioactive debris, further contaminating the air. Rain increases exposure. Kelp absorbs radiation. Berkeley rainwater after the initial accident was 181 times the federal limit for radioactive iodine in drinking water.

The fuel cores of reactors 1, 2, and 3 melted down and through, and may have gone into the Earth.

“The levels of radiation in buildings 1, 2 and 3 are now so high that no human can enter or get close to the molten cores,” said Dr. Helen Caldicott, founder of Physicians for Social Responsibility, and president of the Nuclear Policy Research Institute.

There is ongoing contamination of groundwater, and 400 tons of contaminated water, according to Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), flow into the Pacific every day, with recent huge increases in radiation levels. The plume of radioactive water is crossing the Pacific and will be here soon. It has already reached Alaska, where hundreds of dead sea birds are washing up. Seals, polar bears, and other mammals have sores, are losing fur, and have internal damage. When will dead animals begin washing up here?

The health toll is rising in Japan, including thyroid cancer, rare diseases, and children having heart attacks. It will rise here. Cesium goes to muscle including heart muscle; after Chernobyl, heart disease was much more prevalent than even cancers.

In April 2012, Dr. Tomoyuki Yamazaki said a growing number of children he sees have “nosebleeds that don’t stop, incurable stomatitis … and pains in their chests.” In March 2012, pediatrician Shintaro Kikuchi sent out an international appeal, saying. “We are now in very bad condition. Especially for children. So, please give us help.” How many in the U.S. even heard?

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