Categories

A sample text widget

Etiam pulvinar consectetur dolor sed malesuada. Ut convallis euismod dolor nec pretium. Nunc ut tristique massa.

Nam sodales mi vitae dolor ullamcorper et vulputate enim accumsan. Morbi orci magna, tincidunt vitae molestie nec, molestie at mi. Nulla nulla lorem, suscipit in posuere in, interdum non magna.

Chinese scientist may have discovered the future of batteries

Ford Motor Co and the University of Michigan just announced they would open a new $88 million battery research and manufacturing lab that they hope will accelerate a much-needed breakthrough for the stalling electric auto non-boom (electric cars accounted for less than 1 percent of US auto sales last year; hybrids 3 percent, according to the AP). And batteries are getting the blame.

One of the first persons they should talk to is Chengdu Liang, a staff scientist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee who was born and raised in Hunan province and came to the US about 15 years ago as a graduate student at the University of Tennessee- Knoxville, did a year of post-grad at Oak Ridge and stayed on there, becoming a staff scientist in 2006.

Since then his research has focused on the development of sustainable energy technologies. “Electrical energy storage is a very important and exciting area,” he told China Daily recently, mentioning that China Daily was his favorite newspaper through his college years in Hunan.

“A sustainable energy future lies in the harvesting of intermittent renewable energies to a stable supply of electricity,” he explained, in other words, “When the sun is not shining and the wind is not blowing, the supply of energy is drawing from massive storage of electricity.”

And that means batteries, big batteries. “Large scale storage of electricity needs advanced battery systems that are safe, low cost, and high energy-density,” Liang said.

This past summer, Liang and his team announced a major breakthrough that could have major implications for the quest for an ideal battery for electric cars, not to mention homes and hand-helds.
more chinadaily.com

Share

Leave a Reply