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2012.pdf

1Tampere University, Korkeakoulunkatu 1, FI-33720 Tampere, Finland and 2Free University of Bolzano, Faculty of Science and Technology, P.zza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano, Italy

Abstract: An attempt has been made in this work to study the scattering of laser light by the gravity-like impulse produced in an impulse gravity generator (IGG) and also an experiment has been conducted in order to determine the propagation speed of the gravity impulse. The light attenuation was found to last between 34 and 48 ns and to increase with voltage, up to a maximum of 7% at 2000 kV. The propagation time of the pulse over a distance of 1211 m was measured recording the response of two identical piezoelectric sensors connected to two synchronized rubidium atomic clocks. The delay was 631 ns, corresponding to a propagation speed of 64c. The theoretical analysis of these results is not simple and requires a quantum picture. Different targets (ballistic pendulums, photons, piezoelectric sensors) appear to be affected by the IGG beam in different ways, possibly reacting to components of the beam which propagate with different velocities. Accordingly, the superluminal correlation between the two sensors does not necessarily imply superluminal information transmission. Using the microscopic model for the emission given in Chapter 5, we also have estimated the cross-sectional density of virtual gravitons in the beam and we have shown that their propagation velocity can not be fixed by the emission process. The predicted rate of graviton-photon scattering is consistent with the observed laser attenuation.

Keywords: Theories of gravitation, superconductors, high-Tc superconductors, type-II superconductors, superluminal quantum correlations, x-shaped waves, graviton-photon scattering, virtual gravitons, piezoelectric sensors, rubidium atomic clocks, gravity-like fields.

1. INTRODUCTION

This paper represents the continuation of our 2003 work on a pulsed force beam generator based on high- voltage gas discharges through an YBCO electrode [1]. The device was called “Impulse Gravity Generator” because the beam was found to act upon targets of different mass and composition with a force proportional only to their mass, resulting in target velocities of the order of 1 m/s, with weak dependence on the discharge voltage. We also reported in [1] preliminary results on the interaction of the IGG beam with a laser beam. When the angle formed by the two beams was small (0.1°) and the interaction region long (57 m) a clear attenuation of the light intensity was observed (7-10%) for a time of the order of 10-7 s or less.

The results of the interaction with light have been confirmed by further measurements (Sections 1 and 2). The laser light attenuation was found to last between 34 and 48 ns and to exhibit a steady dependence on the discharge voltage. Moreover, we have been able to measure the propagation time of the pulse over a long distance (1211 m), recording the responses of two identical piezoelectric sensors connected to two synchronized rubidium atomic clocks. Repeated measurements consistently yielded a delay of 631 ns, corresponding to a propagation speed of (641)c. This delay was found to be independent from all the electric parameters of the discharge. The design of the experiment is simple and robust, as it obviously allows to exclude any spurious electromagnetic correlations of the detectors. All measurements were made shortly after the publication of our previous results.

The theoretical interpretation of these results is more recent and has turned out to be quite hard. Phenomena of superluminal propagation have been previously observed with microwaves, and our effect could be the

*Address correspondence to Eveny Podkletnov: Tampere University, Korkeakoulunkatu 1, FI-33720 Tampere, Finland; E-mail: epodkletnov@hotmail.com and Giovanni Modanese: Free University of Bolzano, Faculty of Science and Technology, P.zza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano, Italy; Tel. 0471-017003; E-mail: giovanni.modanese@unibz.it

Giovanni Modanese and Glen A. Robertson (Eds) All rights reserved-© 2012 Bentham Science Publishers

More http://www.americanantigravity.com/files/documents/Podkletnov-Beam-Measurements-2012.pdf

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