Categories

A sample text widget

Etiam pulvinar consectetur dolor sed malesuada. Ut convallis euismod dolor nec pretium. Nunc ut tristique massa.

Nam sodales mi vitae dolor ullamcorper et vulputate enim accumsan. Morbi orci magna, tincidunt vitae molestie nec, molestie at mi. Nulla nulla lorem, suscipit in posuere in, interdum non magna.

USA: Nissan Juke vs Nissan Leaf (Cost Comparisons)

About a month ago, I asked readers which gasoline-powered cars were most similar to some popular EVs on the market. I’m finally using that feedback and updated 2013 EV numbers to run new cost comparisons between these EVs and their gasoline-powered cousins.

To start with, in this first post, I’m going to run down a few cost comparison scenarios for the Nissan Leaf and Nissan Juke. The next post will do the same for the Nissan Leaf and Nissan Rogue. And I will eventually publish more articles comparing other EVs to their closest gasmobiles.

As always, what matters in a cost comparison is what you actually compare (which factors you choose to include), and what assumptions you make. I’m going to be very conservative in my calculations (as in, lean in favor of gasmobiles). I’m doing so for a few reasons:

  1. I think anyone who really cares about human health and the environment is already going to be biking, using mass transit, or at least driving an EV.
  2. I’m obviously in favor of EVs, in general, so I don’t want to be (or come across as) biased towards EVs in my comparisons.
  3. For simplicity’s sake. Adding in the extra costs I’m going to note below would be more challenging and time consuming. (Of course, if you’re really comparing the costs of these cars in an OCD cost-benefit analysis way, you can add in more variables.)

Now, real quickly, here are some of the factors that are not being included in the cost comparisons below:

Pros

  • The benefits to your health, and public health as a whole, from not emitting the pollution that comes from burning gas. (That’s a huge cost, and if you were to add that in, EVs would be the hands-down winner in almost all comparisons.)
  • Same thing for the climate. (Again, if you add climate costs in, EVs would be the clear winners.)
  • The benefits that come from greater comfort. (EVs are nearly silent and offer a smoother ride.)
  • The benefit of not having to stress about gas price swings.
  • The benefit of not being as affected by inflation.
  • If you have solar panels, being even more protected again inflation and increases in “fuel” prices.
  • The time savings from not going to the gas station, not getting oil changes, and bringing your car in for maintenance less often.
  • The benefits of reducing our country’s dependence on foreign oil, and thus improving national security.
  • Of course, the good feeling that comes with all the benefits above is a benefit in itself.

Cons

  • If financing, more likely with an EV since the sticker price is higher, you pay more to the bank/financer.
  • If driving a long distance, you have to plan intelligently and take more breaks (or rent a car, if the company you bought your EV from doesn’t offer that for free).

Anything to add? Drop a note in the comments.

On to the fun:

nissan leaf

vs

nissan juke 2013

After taking the $7,500 federal tax credit, below are 5 hypothetical cost comparisons between the Nissan Leaf and the Nissan Juke (feel free to conduct your own experiments / change the assumptions using this spreadsheet). Maintenance costs per mile and battery replacement costs are kept constant in my 5 comparisons — see the spreadsheet for assumptions.

 

Share

Leave a Reply