Categories

A sample text widget

Etiam pulvinar consectetur dolor sed malesuada. Ut convallis euismod dolor nec pretium. Nunc ut tristique massa.

Nam sodales mi vitae dolor ullamcorper et vulputate enim accumsan. Morbi orci magna, tincidunt vitae molestie nec, molestie at mi. Nulla nulla lorem, suscipit in posuere in, interdum non magna.

‘Electric car is not dead,’ GM says

Despite disappointing sales, exec predicts brighter future for Volt after improvements

By David Shepardsonand Karl Henkel
The Detroit News
0 Comments

GM’s Mark Reuss, center, celebrating after the Cadillac ATS was named car of the year, promised improvements in the next-generation Volt.
GM’s Mark Reuss, center, celebrating after the Cadillac ATS was named car of the year, promised improvements in the next-generation Volt. (Carlos Osorio / Associated Press)

General Motors Co. North America chief Mark Reuss said he isn’t giving up on electric vehicles, despite struggling industry sales in 2012.

“The electric car is not dead,” Reuss said at the Automotive News World Congress on Wednesday night.

He said despite setbacks, the Detroit automaker isn’t giving up on electric autos, even though it had to abandon its initial forecast for its plug-in hybrid Chevrolet Volt.

In 2011, GM sold fewer than 7,700 Volts, below its target of 10,000. It then abandoned goals to sell 45,000 in 2012 and was forced to idle its Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly plant on several occasions to reduce supply.

But sales of the Volt grew, and for all of 2012 they tripled to more than 23,000. And this week at the North American International Auto Show, GM unveiled its new plug-in hybrid Cadillac ELR, a Volt luxury variant that Reuss said GM expects to start building by the end of 2013 at its Detroit Hamtramck Assembly plant.

“We couldn’t be happier … with the Volt,” Reuss said.

He also touted the next-generation Volt and said it “will be even better.” A year ago at the same forum, GM Vice Chairman Steve Girsky said the company needed another six months to see whether the Volt would succeed.

“We’ll get there,” Reuss said. “We will see the day when we have an affordable electric car that offers 300 miles of range with all the comfort and utility of a conventional vehicle. We’re talking about a transformation here. And transformation takes time.”

GM famously pulled the plug on its EV1 — the first mass-produced electric car — built from 1996-99. That vehicle prompted the documentary film “Who Killed the Electric Car?”

Nissan Motor Co’s all-electric Leaf struggled and the automaker failed to double sales in 2012 as it had predicted. It instead sold about the same number as it did in 2011.

From The Detroit News: http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20130117/AUTO04/301170346#ixzz2IDIXCvv3

More detroitnews.com

Share

Leave a Reply