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The 8 Most Energy-Efficient Cars On The Road Read more:

Ford Focus Electric Car

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With gas prices climbing, consumers are looking to save with energy-efficient cars. Luckily, fuel economy standards are on the rise, and there are more electric and hybrid cars on the market.

In fact, all 10 cars on the list of the most fuel-efficient vehicles put out by the Environmental Protection Agency are either electric or hybrid cars. Their mileage is written as mpge, or miles per gallon equivalent.

Two vehicles, the Azure Dynamics Transit Connect Van and Wagon, share the same mechanics and are lumped in sixth position on the EPA’s list. But since those vehicles weren’t in production at press time, Bankrate hasn’t included them on its list.

In addition to fuel savings, keep in mind that electrics and hybrids get federal tax breaks, and some states offer additional tax incentives.

This story was originally published by Bankrate.

The Honda Civic Hybrid gets 44 mpge in the city and on the highway.
The Honda Civic Hybrid gets 44 mpge in the city and on the highway.


The Honda Civic Hybrid comes in one trim option with a suggested starting price of $24,200. Upgrades such as leather seats, satellite-linked navigation and a continuously variable transmission are available for a higher price tag.

The Civic Hybrid has a 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine. It comes standard with a 144-volt lithium-ion battery and a permanent magnet electric motor.

According to the EPA, you can expect to pay around $1,300 over the course of the year for gas, and you’ll travel about 523 miles on a tank.

This vehicle was pushed off of the EPA’s top ten list of energy-efficient cars when the Tesla S was introduced, but Bankrate is including it because two other cars on the list are not yet in production.
Toyota’s Prius Plug-In does 51mpge in the city and 49 mpge on the highway.
Toyota’s Prius Plug-In does 51mpge in the city and 49 mpge on the highway.


The Toyota Prius Plug-in Hybrid is the biggest gas saver in the Prius lineup. The standard model starts at $32,000, and the advanced model begins at $39,525.

The Plug-in gets its power from a 1.8-liter, four-cylinder gas engine combined with an electric motor system, as does the standard Prius. Combined they put out 134 horsepower, Edmunds says. The Plug-in uses a 4.4-kilowatt, lithium-ion battery instead of the nickel-metal hydride found on the standard Prius.

Prius says the Plug-in EV Mode will take you 11 miles on a full charge. After that, the electric and gas engines work together until the battery runs out. That gives it a combined 95 mpge and a combined 50 mpg with just gas, according to the EPA.

The Toyota Prius C also made the EPA’s list, with the base model starting at $18,950. The C is the smallest in the Prius lineup and gets a combined 50 mpg, according to the EPA.

Starting at $24,000, the standard Toyota Prius is also in the lineup of energy-efficient cars. EPA ratings put the combined mpg at 50, the same as the Prius C. But the 51 city mpg of this Prius is a slightly lower than the C, and the 48 highway mpg is slightly higher.
Get 58 mpge city and 62 mpge highway in the Chevy Volt.
Get 58 mpge city and 62 mpge highway in the Chevy Volt.

Robert Libetti/ Business Insider

Starting at $39,145, the Chevy Volt no longer comes with the navigation and Bose audio systems as standard equipment. It’s a plug-in hybrid vehicle that qualifies for federal tax savings up to $7,500 on energy-efficient cars.

As a plug-in hybrid, the Volt comes with two sources of energy. The primary power source comes from a 16-kilowatt-hour, lithium-ion battery pack, which powers the electric motor. When the battery is almost depleted, the 1.4-liter, four-cylinder gasoline engine kicks in, using premium gas.

The EPA ranks this vehicle by combining the mpg of the gas engine with the mpge of the electric motor. It comes out at a combined 60 mpge. According to EPA estimates, you’ll go 35 miles on just the battery and 380 miles with a full tank of gas.

Regenerative braking and the engine generator will partly recharge the battery, but to get a full charge you’ll need to plug in the vehicle. With the 120-volt charger, you’ll get a full charge in about 10 hours, according to Chevy. With the 240-volt charging station, you’ll have a fully charged Volt in around four hours.

Coda’s sedan is good for 77 mpge in the city and 68 mpge highway.
Coda’s sedan is good for 77 mpge in the city and 68 mpge highway.

Coda Automobile

Coda Automotive is new to the electric-car market. It just released the Coda in March. It’s a four-door sedan with a suggested retail price of $37,250, but it gets a federal tax credit of $7,500. If you’re a California resident, you’ll also get state tax credits.

It has a 100-kilowatt electric motor, which is a bit bigger than other electrics on the list of energy-efficient cars. The power comes from a 333-volt, 31-kilowatt-hour, lithium-iron phosphate battery.

With the optional 240-volt home charging station, you’ll get a full battery meter in six hours, according to Coda. The 120-volt standard charger will take 36 to 40 hours.

You can expect to go about 88 miles on a charge with a “fuel” cost of approximately $850 annually to charge up this car, according to EPA estimates


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