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Canada: Tips on joining the electric revolution

The current residential rate for electricity in B.C. is on average about eight cents per kWh. So, an electric vehicle (EV), like a Mitsubishi iMiev, will consume the equivalent of $1.28 (or less) worth of electricity to fully recharge its 16 kWh battery ($.08 X 16).

“Most of these [E’s] go about 5 km/kW, or to put that another way, that’s about 80 cents to drive 50 km,” explains BC Hydro’s Mark Dubois-Phillips.

Taking that a step further, an EV owner would save about $1,800 to $2,000 annually on operating costs when com-pared to operating a conventional mid-sized car.

And of course, there’s also a huge difference in terms of environmental impact.

“That same mid-sized gasoline engine car emits about 239 grams of CO2 per kilo-metre,” says Dubois-Phillips. “If you drive an electric car in B.C., it will emit the equivalent of about 4 grams/Km, taking into account our entire generation station mix.”

Whatever inspires you to buy an electric vehicle, or a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), you also need to decide on how you are going to recharge its battery on a regular basis. Typically, this is done with a home charger of some kind. A number of them are already on the market, and the provincial government will help out with a limited time $500 rebate offer on approved units.

Home-use chargers are categorized as either Level 1, a 120 volt system, or Level 2, a 240 volt system. A portable Level 1 cable set usually comes with an EV, but it will function better if you can plug it into a dedicated out-let that’s not a shared circuit with other electrical devices in your home

More theprovince.com

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