Categories

Archives

A sample text widget

Etiam pulvinar consectetur dolor sed malesuada. Ut convallis euismod dolor nec pretium. Nunc ut tristique massa.

Nam sodales mi vitae dolor ullamcorper et vulputate enim accumsan. Morbi orci magna, tincidunt vitae molestie nec, molestie at mi. Nulla nulla lorem, suscipit in posuere in, interdum non magna.

USA: 2011 Nissan LEAF Road Test and Review


Ready to start counting miles per dollar rather than miles per gallon? Consider buying the all-electric vehicle (EV) 2011 Nissan LEAF.

As the first fully-electric mass production EV in America with ZERO harmful emissions, this versatile five-seat hatchback is affordable and has truly fun-to-drive EV performance.

Plus, the 2011 Nissan LEAF has really cool technology, an awesome interior, rather nice-looking exterior and a boat load of federal and potential state tax credits to make buying the LEAF easier.

How much does The LEAF cost? The base MSRP (including delivery charges) of a 2011 Nissan LEAF is $32,780 (or a $349 per month lease). A $7,500 federal tax credit (applied at tax time), brings the price down to $25,280.

Also, residents of certain states are eligible for additional credits. For example, California residents, depending on city of purchase, can get an extra $5,000 rebate. Remember, there are also thousands of dollars in potential costs for an in-home charging unit although awesome rebates do apply in some cases here too.

Since you won’t be visiting a gas station any longer, what about in-home charging stations? Nissan says these “personal charging docks” operate on a 220-volt supply and will cost about $2,200 to purchase and install. Most buyers will be eligible for a federal tax rebate of up to 50% of the installation cost, with a maximum benefit of $2000. Using current national electricity averages, Nissan says the LEAF will cost less than $3 to “fill up” and drive to approximately 100 miles.

What else is great about the 2011 Nissan LEAF? You can drive it in the carpool (HOV) lane with just the driver in the car. Really? YES! Plus, being a 2011 Nissan LEAF owner has a few other benefits such as reduced off-hour electricity rates in some areas and free metered parking in some beach towns. COOL!

Unfortunately, there’s one BIG problem. The 2011 Nissan LEAF can only drive for 100 miles on a single charge. Yep, long road trips are, for now, virtually impossible for the 2011 Nissan LEAF owner.

Another big bummer about the 2011 Nissan LEAF is that Nissan is “carefully managing the purchase process from the first step.” That would be an understatement. Nissan is not only asking for your personal information via the internet, but also for a fully refundable $99 reservation fee and is also qualifying buyers and leasees on some as yet undetermined critieria.

Even with Nissan carefully orchestrating each purchase and the LEAF’s super low driving range, more than 16,100 Americans plunked down $99 to reserve their LEAF, which will be available in Nissan dealerships as early as this coming December.

In the end, the Gulf Oil disaster, global warming and the 2011 Nissan LEAF have come together as a powerful sign that planet-friendly fuels and vehicles are here NOW. And although America has yet to build an EV charging infrastructure, this divergent trilogy of disasters and one lone redeemer (other than the more expensive and rather strange Chevrolet Volt) is drastically speeding up our country’s EV infrastructure.

2011 Nissan LEAF Exterior
Outside, the 2011 Nissan LEAF looks like any other Asian-American compact sedan on the road today. Thankfully, Nissan had the sense to make the exterior design accessible to just about anyone.

No, the 2011 Nissan LEAF doesn’t look like a funky Toyota Prius nor is it a two-seat sports car like the $100,000+ Tesla Roadster. Yes, the 2011 Nissan LEAF does fit up to five adults VERY comfortably and in sensible style without being over-the-top weird.

While chatting it up with Nissan product managers, I discovered the 2011 Nissan LEAF’s exterior has more to do with aerodynamics than pretty packaging. Everything down to the head lamps were tested numerous times in wind tunnels to create the most aerodynamic shape for maximum efficiency, which translates to more miles you can drive on one charge.

2011 Nissan LEAF Interior
As a professional road test reviewer, I was worried the inside of the 2011 Nissan LEAF would either be sub-par or just plain weird. Don’t worry. I fell in LOVE with the way cool and super comfortable interior of the 2011 Nissan LEAF..

Yes, there is truly enough room for five adult passengers. The quality of the materials and the overall design are high quality, modern and yet classic at the same time. Nissan calls it a “pleasing and stylish cabin environment.” I definitely agree.

In the driver’s cockpit, I was impressed with the feel-good steering wheel, super modern “stick shift,” and wonderfully all-digital instrument panel. Fortunately, Nissan did not go overboard and made the instrumentation on the 2011 Nissan LEAF very understandable for today’s digital-age buyer.

I was also a big fan of the butterfly-shaped central console with integrated touch screen navigation, Bluetooth connectivity and audio system. Although not as sophisticated as Ford’s SYNC or upcoming MyFord Touch systems, this Nissan infotainment technology is definitely top notch.

In the rear seat, I had more than enough leg room for my 5 ft. 8 in. frame and the second row is somewhat plus for an affordable compact car. Cargo space isn’t huge, but it isn’t tiny either.

2011 Nissan LEAF Performance
It will take some time for American drivers to get used not only to driving EVs, but to the big difference in everything from paying dollars per mile to electric motors to charging stations to lithium ion battery (LIB) packs, which speed the motor along via electricity rather than dangerous petroleum.

So, how does it feel to drive the all-electric motor on the 2011 Nissan LEAF? Pretty darned AWESOME!

On a 20-minute road trip through sunny Santa Monica during traffic hour, I discovered the drive on the 2011 Nissan LEAF EV feels almost like a gas-powered sports car except for some big differences.

First off, electric motors have fewer moving parts. There’s no automatic transmission, for example. This means the electric motor has powerful torque from the first press of the accelerator and moves quickly at “warp speed” up to about 90 mph.

Taking The LEAF on Santa Monica’s straightaways and curvy back roads, I was surprisingly awed by the pure power and fun-to-drive performance of this “inexpensive” EV.

Even with the warp-speed feel of the electric engine, the 2011 Nissan LEAF drives much like a conventional compact car except for the regenerative brakes, which give a slight tug when decompressed.

Overall, the performance on the 2011 Nissan LEAF is SUPER FUN. Bravo Nissan!
Read more at autotropolis.com

Share

2 comments to USA: 2011 Nissan LEAF Road Test and Review

  • […] USA: 2011 Nissan LEAF Road Test and Review | 4EVRiders.org … […]

  • […] USA: 2011 Nissan LEAF Road Test and Review By onlineautobrochure online auto brochure is an informational blog dedicated to the latest automotive news and auto brochure pdf downloads. Please visit us and enjoy, thanks.   Unfortunately, there’s one BIG problem. The 2011 Nissan LEAF can only drive for 100 miles on a single charge. Yep, long road trips are, for now, virtually impossible for the 2011 Nissan LEAF owner. Another big bummer about the 2011 Nissan LEAF is that Nissan is “carefully managing the purchase process from the first step.” That would be an understatement. Nissan is not only asking for your personal information via the internet, but also for a fully refundable $99 reservation fee and is also qualifying buyers and leasees on some as yet undetermined critieria.   Contine reading this article here. […]

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.